Monday, September 18, 2006

Edenstar Blog Tour

I am taking part in a blog tour highlighting the Edenstar Books and Games website where you will find all sorts of products for Christians who enjoy Science Fiction and Fantasy.

Here is what Bill and Cheryl Bader, the founders of this company, wrote about their purpose:

The traditional Christian bookstore shelves science fiction with other fiction. So we sort through prairie romances to find the occasional science fiction or fantasy title.

In the general-market bookstore, Christian science fiction is shelved with other science fiction, if it's carried at all. So here again we sift through inappropriate material to find the books we like to read.

That's why we started Edenstar Books and Games in February 2003. We believe there are many others like us, who would love to read more Christian-themed science fiction and fantasy, if they just knew where to find it.


I applaud this effort. This genre needs more exposure, and Bill and Cheryl are to be congratulated for highlighting a product line that is frequently criticized in Christian circles.

Here is the link to their website: http://www.edenstarbooks.com/

You will find reviews on products, particularly books. Unfortunately, Cheryl's review of my book, Raising Dragons, took issue with how I developed my characters. She wrote:

Unfortunately the level of characterization doesn’t quite match the epic plot line. As often happens with Christian fiction, the lead character is too good to be true. Model student Billy attempts to restrain the troublemaker intent on setting off the school fire alarm, only to wind up accused himself. Billy and his friends come off as good examples rather than real kids.

I disagree with her strongly. I passionately defend the fact that real kids can be good, holy, and virtuous. Her stand that "real" kids can't be that good is a myth, and her false notion is a plague that contributes to the downfall of our youth culture. I wrote my characters the way I did intentionally, and the amazing feedback I'm getting from hundreds of readers, telling me that these characters have dramatically transformed their lives, is proof that they are hungry to hear the truth that God is powerful enough to make real kids holy.

Even though I passionately disagree with Cheryl's review, I still applaud and support the Baders' efforts. This genre is important, and it takes courage and steadfastness to make such an effort work.

Below are the other bloggers who are taking part in the blog tour. Check them out to learn more about what people are saying about the Edenstar website.

http://jimfictionreview.blogspot.com/ Jim Black
http://www.journeyintograce.blogspot.com Jackie Castle
http://invalslittleworld.blogspot.com/ Valerie Comer
http://bethgoddard.blogspot.com/ Beth Goddard
http://foundationsofhope.blogspot.com Leathel Grody
http://www.karenhancock.blogspot.com/ Karen Hancock
http://clawoftheconciliator.blogspot.com Elliot Hanowski
http://writingchristiannovels.blogspot.com/ Katie Hart
http://sphibbs.blogspot.com/ Sherrie Hibbs
http://www.sharonswriting.blogspot.com/ Sharon Hinck
http://www.spoiledfortheordinary.blogspot.com/ Jason Joyner
http://tinakulesa.com/weblog/ Tina Kulesa
http://www.shadowofthewood.com Rachel Marks
http://shenandoahdawn.blogspot.com/ Shannon McNear
http://rebeccaluellamiller.wordpress.com/ Rebecca LuElla Miller
http://www.unseenworlds.blogspot.com/ Cheryl Russel
http://mirathon.blogspot.com/ Mirtika Schultz
http://jerkrenak.blogspot.com/ Stuart Stockton
http://christiansf.blogspot.com/ Steve Trower
http://www.faithfiction.blogspot.com/ Joleen Howell

3 comments:

Becky said...

Nice job, Bryan. I hadn't even thought how this tour would give you the opportunity for a little rebuttal. Well said.

Becky

Clefspeare said...

Becky,

You've probably heard me harp on that subject long enough to know that it's a passion of mine, so I took the opportunity. Although I strongly disagreed with her, I hope I was kind enough. Her later point in the review about informational dialogue was well-taken. I can see where that popped up in two places in Raising Dragons, and I wouldn't do it that way today.

Galactic Overlord-In-Chief said...

Billy strikes her as "too good?" He seemed rather ordinary to me when I first read the story, except perhaps for trying to stop the troublemaker from setting off the alarm (Many other kids might have kept their distance or gone for an adult).

I just don't think that all teenagers in fiction have to be crass, obnoxious, or rebellious to be credible.